Conditions that Affect Peripheral Vision

Blurred peripheral visionEven if patients have enjoyed healthy eyes and clear vision their whole life, they should receive professional eye care services, including comprehensive eye exams, at least once every two years. When eye conditions develop, most do not result in noticeable side effects right away. Early treatment is the key to preserving good vision, and a routine eye exam is the best way to diagnose eye problems so that they can be treated early on.

At Primary Eye Care Associates, our experienced doctors treat a range of eye conditions, including those that cause a loss of peripheral vision. Through a routine eye exam, we can diagnose conditions that affect peripheral vision so that our Chicago, IL patients can receive the care they need to maintain clear eyesight. Those who would like to learn more about our eye care services should contact us to set up an appointment.

Peripheral Vision Loss

Peripheral vision is that which allows us to see objects at the side of the eyes, or in the area surrounding our central point of vision. When peripheral vision is lost, it is often referred to as tunnel vision, because it is like looking at the world through a tunnel. Central vision remains clear and focused, but peripheral vision looks blurry or completely blacked out.

Conditions that Affect Peripheral Vision

When peripheral vision is lost, especially if the loss is sudden, it may be a sign of a serious medical condition. A stroke, brain damage, or concussion can affect peripheral vision, so it is important to seek medical treatment right away if sudden changes in vision occur.

In many cases, peripheral vision is affected by other eye conditions. These conditions do not typically result in noticeable side effects right away, so if peripheral vision is affected, the condition is likely advanced, and treatment should be sought as soon as possible. The eye conditions that are most commonly known to affect peripheral vision include:

  • Glaucoma: Open-angle glaucoma is a condition that can develop when intraocular pressure gets too high. Increased pressure can cause damage to the optic nerves, which in turn can affect peripheral vision.
  • Retinal damage: The retina is the thin layer of light-sensitive cells that sits at the back of the eye and sends signals to the brain to create a visual image. If the peripheral area of the retina is damaged, peripheral vision will also be impacted. Similarly, if the retina becomes detached, peripheral vision will suffer.
  • Eye occlusions: Eye occlusions occur when there is a blockage in the eye that prevents blood from flowing to the eye structures. If an eye occlusion blocks blood from reaching the optic nerves, peripheral vision can be damaged.

Treatment

In most cases, the eye conditions that affect peripheral vision can be treated or managed so that peripheral vision can be preserved. The exact treatment technique that is used will depend on what is interfering with peripheral vision, and how far advanced the condition is. Our doctors will create a customized treatment plan for each patient after conducting an eye exam and diagnosing the condition that needs treatment.

Contact Us

Whether you have noticed a change in your vision, or are simply in need of a routine eye exam, the experienced team of doctors at Primary Eye Care Associates is here to help. Contact us at your earliest convenience to learn more about our comprehensive range of eye care services.